ForeWord Reviews

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An Invitation to Think and Feel Differently in the New Millennium

Clarion Review (4 Stars)

Harry J. Bury brings a wealth of experience and deep spiritual awareness to his visionary yet practical guide to understanding evolutionary cultural shifts in this new millennium. Integrating spirituality, scholarly research, and political activism, Bury’s insightful analysis of what lies behind the conditions and conflicts prevalent today points to the existence of three different and concurrent worldviews: the Pre-Modern, the Modern, and the new Emerging Worldview, each of which leads people to behave in characteristic ways. In An Invitation to Think and Feel Differently in the New Millennium, he explains each worldview and provides insight into the behaviors of others, opportunities to expand one’s own way of thinking, and encouragement through the promise of positive change.

Bury confidently asserts that thought and feelings are transformative. He believes that, as people grow into the Emerging Worldview, they will come to realize that positive action on behalf of others also benefits the one taking that action. In addition, Bury tells readers that changing how one thinks and feels about significant fundamental issues, will lead them to make their own contributions to a world that works for everyone. He brings to his task of changing minds and hearts an almost uncanny ability to unmask the hidden assumptions and beliefs that underlie the challenges of these times—often reframing issues in a way that makes it startlingly clear that new perspectives are needed if we are to survive and thrive. For example, efforts to eradicate poverty, when undertaken by those other than the poor, often focus on the “problem” of poverty, yet, a change of perspective may reveal that a focus on greed, both personal and institutionalized, might be far more productive.

Linking theory with practice, spirituality with science, reason with emotion, and scholarship with real-world experience, Bury’s work, enhanced by an attractive cover and nineteen black-and-white illustrations, is essential reading for all who wish to navigate the turbulent waters of a world in transition.

While the few typographical errors and omissions in the text do little to detract from the book’s overall value, there are some content issues. For example, the statement that “God heard Immaculée’s prayer,” in explanation of Immaculée Ilibagiza’s escape from death in the Rwandan massacre, seems uncharacteristic of New Millennium thought.

Nevertheless, Bury’s passionate and timely book admirably explains the titanic clash between worldviews that is occurring as Pre-Modern and Modern thinkers fight to retain an increasingly precarious grasp on their version of reality.

Harry J. Bury is an American Roman Catholic priest and an activist. He holds a PhD from Case Western Reserve University and is Professor Emeritus of Organizational Behavior and Administration at Baldwin Wallace College.

Kristine Morris