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Alistair Smith

My Story

Clarion Review (2 Stars)

Alistair Smith: My Story is a short novel told through the voice of a young man whose life takes a series of fantastical turns that involve beautiful women with large breasts. He is well-endowed, but his sexual prowess is made almost modest by an irresistibly gentle personality. As his story begins, Alistair goes from being heir to a huge fortune to being disowned when caught in a bedroom scandal. Soon after he runs into Susan, his former gym teacher. She becomes pregnant with Alistair’s child and blackmails him to be her sex toy in exchange for not pressing paternity issues.

The remainder of T C Briggs’ novel follows this general theme. Alistair meets more beautiful, full-breasted women who fall in love with him while he remains chaste or not, but always sweet and wonderful. While in Hawaii, he is deceived by a woman who steals his sperm to give to Susan, who gets pregnant again and continues to torment him. Later, a wealthy older woman takes him under her wing, introduces him to her breathtakingly gorgeous personal trainer, Natasha, and they are drawn to one another as soul mates.

The twists and turns of the plot quickly become predictable. Alistair Smith has little value as literature or popular fiction. It is straightforward erotica for men. As a character, Alistair only works as a satirical Lothario, albeit with a heart of gold, who lives out every young man’s ultimate fantasy. Even the blackmail by the gym teacher and the death of Grace, the rich older woman, turn out to be positives. Susan goes to prison and Alistair raises their two children with Natasha, who is conveniently sterile, in the mansion left to them by Grace.

The sex scenes are explicit and fairly well written, but the corny dialogue is off-putting. For example, during Alistair’s first time with Marcia, the woman who steals his sperm, he muses: “She smiled like the Cheshire cat with anticipation, taunting me with her sumptuous figure, begging me to come closer and sample the fine goods she had on offer.”

The cover of Alistair Smith: My Story shows a dimly lit bed with disheveled sheets. There are very few typographical errors in the novel and the grammar is acceptable. Teenage boys and young men in their early twenties appear to be the target audience.

Patty Sutherland